IPM Success Stories

IPM is good for people, the environment, and the pocketbook

Since 2000, we’ve fostered the development and adoption of integrated pest management, supporting projects that focus on important pest problems and provide economic, environmental, and human health benefits to our region. Read on to learn about the impacts of projects we’ve funded and about the work of our partners nationwide.

February 1, 2009
Sales Tip Scales for Eco Apple Growers

Growers, scientists, and marketers have successfully boosted the market for IPM-grown apples through their collaborations in the Northeast.

October 1, 2008
Battling Pests in Public Housing

Urban pests like cockroaches and mice can trigger asthma, contaminate food, and damage buildings. They can also cause stress and lead people to misuse pesticides.

October 1, 2008
NRCS Incentives Could Boost IPM Adoption

Nearly 400 northeastern growers and NRCS staff have attended on-farm workshops aimed at improving growers’ ability to earn financial incentives for managing pests in ways that protect the environment.

July 1, 2008
The Honey Bee Puzzle

In 2006, managed honey bee colonies began to disappear in large numbers without known reason. IPM experts are looking for ways to keep colonies healthy.

July 1, 2008
Reading, Writing, and IPM

Teaching IPM concepts to school children has emerged as a strategy that prepares all citizens to make decisions that safeguard the environment and human health.

February 2, 2008
In Hot Water

Portable immersion system thwarts pests of ornamental plants. In the $10 billion U.S. nursery industry, getting stock plant cuttings off to a pest-free start can prevent costly infestations and pesticide treatments later.

February 2, 2008
Resistance Is Futile

… or at least diminished, thanks to reduced-area treatments on potatoes. Entomologist Andrei Alyokhin led a team of researchers who reduced the amount of imidacloprid used on potato crops, treating only selected areas on the perimeter of the field.

February 2, 2008
IPM Hits Us Where We Live!

Sustainable lawns at the U.S. Botanical Garden; Practicing IPM at home protects water quality; Reducing health risks for public housing residents.